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www.goodeatsfanpage.com • View topic - The Interview

The Interview

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The Interview

Postby ABwannabe » Fri Dec 19, 2014 2:43 pm

So, reddit seems to be all in a tizzy that Sony decided not to show The Interview, because of threats of violence to the theaters. In my opinion, Sony taking a stand and showing the movie would be noble and "right", but not necessarily what they *should* have done. Let me explain my paradox.

If they *had* shown the movie, they would be introducing a risk to the lives of other people. People over whom they have no direct responsibility. If people had died, Sony would have had to deal with the moral (and possibly legal, or litigious) ramifications. They're in the business of making movies, not risking lives.

So, I agree with the decision to not show it in theaters. I would love to see it released in DVD, Netflix, Amazon, or even free to thumb their nose at the people threatening them, while stepping around the thtreatened risk.

What do you think?
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Re: The Interview

Postby todd » Fri Dec 19, 2014 4:33 pm

I agree with the President.
They f'd up.
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Re: The Interview

Postby okbye » Fri Dec 19, 2014 7:48 pm

They should have pulled the plug long ago, way before it got to this point.
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Re: The Interview

Postby Kinsley » Fri Dec 19, 2014 9:07 pm


It was a bad idea. I cringed every time I saw the promos.
Just because you have the right to do something, doesn't
mean you should.

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Re: The Interview

Postby Slamdunkpro » Fri Dec 19, 2014 10:40 pm

Funny how there wasn't the same outrage about Death of a President.
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Re: The Interview

Postby Kinsley » Sat Dec 20, 2014 6:30 am

Slamdunkpro wrote:Funny how there wasn't the same outrage about Death of a President.

That was a British film, that was released and shown at the
2006 Toronto International Film Festival. Except being about
the assassination of a head of state, how is it similar?

There was some outrage. According to Wikipedia:


The central conceit of Death of a President was much criticised by those
who believed it exploited the subject of presidential assassination, and
that by doing so, was in bad taste. Gretchen Esell of the Texas Republican
Party ... "I find this shocking, I find it disturbing. I don't know if there are
many people in America who would want to watch something like that."
Hillary Clinton ... "I think it's despicable. I think it's absolutely outrageous.
That anyone would even attempt to profit on such a horrible scenario
makes me sick

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Re: The Interview

Postby okbye » Sat Dec 20, 2014 7:28 am

I've never heard of that movie before this fiasco. Two wrongs don't make a right anyway, especially if one is completely obscure.
I don't mean to sound cold, cruel or vicious but I am so that's the way it comes out - Bill Hicks

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Re: The Interview

Postby Kinsley » Sat Dec 20, 2014 7:46 am

okbye wrote:I've never heard of that movie before this fiasco. Two wrongs
don't make a right anyway, especially if one is completely obscure.

If you are talking about The Interview, it's because of your TV viewing
habits. It was advertised heavily on channels that I watch.

If you are referring to Death of a President, I never heard of it either.

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Re: The Interview

Postby todd » Sat Dec 20, 2014 7:58 am

If I may, I'd like to amend my statement.
Sony, the president, and the distributors, should have come up
with a strategy to deal with this silliness.
Makes us look like a bunch of pussies.
:oops:
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Re: The Interview

Postby okbye » Sat Dec 20, 2014 10:24 pm

Kinsley wrote:
okbye wrote:I've never heard of that movie before this fiasco. Two wrongs
don't make a right anyway, especially if one is completely obscure.

If you are talking about The Interview, it's because of your TV viewing
habits. It was advertised heavily on channels that I watch.

If you are referring to Death of a President, I never heard of it either.


I was referring to Death of a President.

For the record I don't think it's right to "kill" any real person on film unless they're in on the joke. It's creepy and wrong. Everyone has the right to free speech but they do not have the right to not be bashed by their peers if it's stupid and wrong. You have to deal with the consequences of what you have said.
I don't mean to sound cold, cruel or vicious but I am so that's the way it comes out - Bill Hicks

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Re: The Interview

Postby carla » Sat Dec 20, 2014 11:49 pm

I agree the movie never should have been approved or made. This movie was not worth making, in my opinion. It's not the type I would ever see. But I also think it was a very poor, horrible, stupid choice to pursue a movie with this plot. Stupid idea, stupid movie. I agree that if a movie was made by another nation depicting death of, let alone assassination of, a US president, we'd be up in arms, at least figuratively. Many Americans would be SCREAMING, ranting if another country made a movie depicting attempt to and/or assassination of our president, any of them. So why make one about another country? Stupid.

If one reads news in depth, it was Japanese president of Sony, don't remember if he's president of Sony Entertainment, who requested the death scene toned down. His requests were mostly fulfilled. Great. They simply hid some explosion fire and brains.

There is good coverage in LA Times, because they're closest to Hollywood. Remember, Sony is a Japanese company. Japan has real reason to fear N. Korea. N. Korea is not just a joke to them. Japanese citizens have been kidnapped from Japan! There's ocean territory conflict between them. This is not just about a movie. But most Americans are not aware of these geo-political issues. It's easy to find documentation/news stories about their conflicts.

I also agree this is not necessarily Sony's, or any company's battle to fight. Not nationally or internationally or politically. Hell, the globe is controlled as much, if not more, by corporatocracy as by national governments and their bureaucracies, which pander and bow to corporations. They should work together closer, I guess. But corporations rarely go to war.

As many have written about, What if it WASN'T N. Korea? I'm deeply cynical, skeptical and sick; I admit it. What if this was a diversion, to blame N. Korea? Could be. Read what the computer security companies and writers have to say, don't just take the gov't or CIA word for it. It may well be them, but -- read the computer experts.

Given how involved every American is with corporations, whether buying from them, holding stock, or fighting against them, shouldn't corporations consider the effects, impacts of their products and policies? oh, maybe not because they rarely give a flying frock. Sony should have been more careful in the case of this not valuable movie. Free speech, yay, sure. but to defend a piece of crap like this? Oh. Sorry. Got too opinionated. :D

My mind is chemically altered by choice tonight, which is why I'm loose enough now to chime in on this topic, and can't type well.

This editorial expresses many of my thoughts; hope some of you read it. Maybe I'll post the entire text.
http://www.latimes.com/business/hiltzik/

emphasis by me:

Sony Pays High Price for Ignoring its Past

"How grave is the cyberattack on Sony Pictures Entertainment? Here's one high-level Sony executive:

"We have been reminded in recent days of the fact that no one is immune from the threat of cyber attack.... The attack on us was, we believe, unprecedented in its size and scope.... We believed that the security we had in place was very, very strong.... However, the intensity and sophistication of the hack was such that even despite those best measures that we had taken, it was not sufficient."

The executive is Tim Schaaff, president of Sony Network Entertainment International, speaking before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce. Here's the punchline: He was speaking on June 2, 2011.
Last edited by carla on Sun Dec 21, 2014 12:07 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Interview

Postby carla » Sat Dec 20, 2014 11:59 pm

Continuing HIltzik's LA Times opinion piece:
(Note that theaters had already pulled out, so Sony had NO PLACE TO SHOW THE MOVIE. I realize they have now shelved it entirely, including VOD.
color emphasis added by me.)

"Hackers had attacked Sony Online Entertainment and its PlayStation Network, forcing the company to shut the services down for weeks. Schaaff told the committee that Sony recognized "that the scrutiny we are likely to be under from the hackers will continue" and that "we've made additional commitments to enhance the security of our network."

The evidence today is: Whatever they did — if they did anything — it wasn't enough.

Sony's executive ranks never got the message that they shouldn't transmit their passwords by email, or keep employees' salaries, Social Security numbers or medical claim information in their systems without encryption. Technology that might have enabled the company to detect or defeat another large-scale assault either wasn't adequate or wasn't implemented at all.

Sony may not be unique among corporations in the apparent laxity of its cybersecurity, and it may be impossible to make any system 100% secure. But as Schaaff acknowledged more than three years ago, Sony was very much on notice that it should implement anti-hacking protocols second to none.

That's why the company deserves a heavy measure of blame for the attack that has created chaos in its filmed entertainment division — not because it released and then withdrew "The Interview," the Seth Rogen/James Franco North Korean assassination comedy blamed for the hack, which the FBI says was launched by North Korea. Inflammatory movies get released by major studios all the time; if they score at the box office, the studio gets praised for its edginess and nerve.

Yet it's the decision to withdraw "The Interview" for which Sony is taking fire. The Hollywood creative community and numerous pundits have denounced Sony's decision as an act of cowardice. They say it's a craven capitulation to the hackers who invaded the company's computer systems and then issued threats of violence against theaters that screen the movie.
Sony's decision was more like a capitulation to reality. Distribution companies can't keep a movie in theaters if independent theater chains such as Regal or AMC refuse to show it. Sony reportedly also heard from its fellow studios, which were panicking that yuletide moviegoers would avoid going to any movie at any megaplex showing "The Interview." Visions of a crucial Christmas weekend box office shrinking to nothing danced in their heads. (Sony has its own would-be blockbuster, "Annie," in theaters for the Christmas family trade.)


Sure, Sony could have threatened to sue any theater that violated its contractual commitment to show "The Interview," but that's hardly practical. So it followed the precept by former Israeli Prime Minister Shimon Peres, no stranger to tough decisions: "If a problem has no solution, it may not be a problem, but a fact, not to be solved but to be coped with." Sony coped.

If you're looking for cowardice, you have to cast the net much wider. The entire movie industry capitulated.

Just read its pusillanimous "statement of support" for Sony in its hour of need. As my colleague Richard Verrier reported on Tuesday, the other major studios originally rebuffed efforts to craft a joint statement. The eventual product, which went out under the badge of the Motion Picture Assn. of America, was drafted after tortuous machinations by Sony Pictures Chairman Michael Lynton and MPAA Chairman Chris Dodd, a former Democratic senator from Connecticut. After it was released, no studio head would come to the phone to expand upon it. Dodd refused to comment.

The MPAA wouldn't go beyond its text, which reads in its entirety: "As we've said, Sony Pictures is not just a valued member of our association family, but they are friends and colleagues and we feel for them. We continue to be in constant touch with their leadership and will be of any assistance to them that we can."

In Hollywood, that's how we spell "courage."

The statement doesn't say that one possible reason the other studio heads were in "constant touch" with Sony's leadership was to urge it to kill "The Interview." A whole section of the MPAA's website is devoted to "preserving free speech." So how come no one defended Sony? (George Clooney also says he was unable to get anyone in Hollywood to sign an open letter stating, "We fully support Sony's decision not to submit to these hackers' demands.")
The other phenomenon against which Sony has no defense is panic. The threat of violence at theaters was nebulous, and dismissed by law enforcement. It's impossible to know whether the public would have shrugged it off, or stayed home in droves. It's impossible to know how many theaters might have shown the movie, or what would have happened if Sony had held exhibitors to their commitment to open the movie on Christmas Day.

But since 9/11 — the date invoked by hackers to scare moviegoers away from "The Interview" — many of America's political leaders have capitalized on public fears for political gain. The threat of attack has been used to justify torture, to carry loaded firearms in stores and schools, and to bolster security at airports and office buildings.
The latest example of this ginned-up hysteria involved Ebola, an epidemic disease in West Africa that resulted in four cases and one death in the United States, but was exploited by a handful of governors desperate to look tough. Public health, as a recent article in the New England Journal of Medicine put it, was "used as a tool to serve primarily political purposes."


One can draw a direct line from the climate of fear created by this political environment to the reaction by theater owners and Sony. The corporate suites at every level of the entertainment industry have shown they can't think clearly when even a putative threat is laid down by shadowy forces that may or may not have the resources to make good on them.

Almost any movie worth seeing has the capacity to tick off someone, somewhere; everyone now knows what it takes to drive a film into oblivion. So there will be fewer movies greenlighted and more films that are stupid and crass, but not "political."

Farewell, "The Interview"; hello, "Dumb & Dumber 3."
Last edited by carla on Sun Dec 21, 2014 1:21 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Interview

Postby carla » Sun Dec 21, 2014 12:05 am

(Note that theaters had already pulled out, so Sony had NO PLACE TO SHOW THE MOVIE)

Yes it would be good to see them release the movie in other forms. I know many have said it would be hugely viewed as spite viewing. Torrent release and VOD, etc. would make a statement. We don't know yet if they will; they're biding their time through the storm.
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