[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /viewtopic.php on line 988: date(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone.
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /viewtopic.php on line 988: getdate(): It is not safe to rely on the system's timezone settings. You are *required* to use the date.timezone setting or the date_default_timezone_set() function. In case you used any of those methods and you are still getting this warning, you most likely misspelled the timezone identifier. We selected the timezone 'UTC' for now, but please set date.timezone to select your timezone.
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/functions.php on line 4505: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /includes/functions.php:3706)
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/functions.php on line 4507: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /includes/functions.php:3706)
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/functions.php on line 4508: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /includes/functions.php:3706)
[phpBB Debug] PHP Notice: in file /includes/functions.php on line 4509: Cannot modify header information - headers already sent by (output started at /includes/functions.php:3706)
www.goodeatsfanpage.com • View topic - Grilling 101 – Spatchcocked Chicken

Grilling 101 – Spatchcocked Chicken

Here you'll find tutorials, how-to's, gear discussions and everything you need to make your kitchen a well-oiled machine.

Moderators: Grovite, Slamdunkpro

Grilling 101 – Spatchcocked Chicken

Postby Slamdunkpro » Tue Aug 19, 2008 9:16 am

Following up on the hanger steak tutorial I thought I’d explore some basic grilling techniques that might be helpful to the new or casual backyard cook.

Spatchcock chicken is simply a chicken that has been butterflyed by the removal of the backbone. Spatchcoking a chicken is a great alternative to beer can chicken which requires a fair amount of vertical cooking space. As an added bonus a spatchcocked chicken will easily cook in under an hour.

As in all of these tutorials, it takes far longer to read and look at the pictures than it does to perform the actual procedure. You can spatchcock a chicken in under 10 minuets.

When purchasing a chicken for spatchcocking and grilling, try to find a broiler (also called a fryer). These will cook more evenly than a roaster with it’s significantly larger breast.

Before you get chicken goo all over your hands grab your favorite poultry rub and about a ¼ to ½ stick of softened butter.
Image

Add a good bit of rub to the butter and mix well
Image

Set aside
Image

Now on to the chicken!

To spatchcock a chicken you will need a pair of kitchen scissors or poultry shears (an 8” chef’s knife will do if you don’t have scissors or shears) and a paring knife.
Image

First remove the package of jiblets and (if in the cavity) the neck. Then rinse your chicken inside and out and pat dry
Image

Place the chicken on a cutting board and make sure that it’s oriented correctly - you want the backbone facing up.

Incorrect - breast side up
Image

Correct - Back side up – you’re going to use your scissors and cut along both sides of the spine (dotted lines)
Image

You’re cutting through the ribs so this will require a little force – if you’re using a chef’s knife you want to slice through the skin and back meat first, then use the heel of the blade as a mini cleaver.
Cut down one side
Image

Then the other
Image

You can save the back for soup or stock or discard it.
Image
Once you have the spine out, use your scissors to remove the large fatty tail piece and discard
Image

Now flip the chicken over and turn it around so you are facing the neck cavity. You want to remove the wishbone.(Some people just press down on the chicken and snap the wishbone, but I prefer to remove it)

Reach into the neck cavity with your finger to locate the wishbone at the edge of the cavity. Then take your paring knife and scrap the meat away from the wishbone on both sides. Wiggle it with your finger and it will pull right out.

Locate and scrape
Image

Scrape the other side
Image

Pop the wishbone out
Image

Now turn the bird back over (meat side up) and locate the keel bone in the center of the chicken.
Image

Use your paring knife to slice through the membrane covering the keel bone and work down either side. The keel bone will lift up and out of the breast. You may have to slice the cartilage that attached the keel bone to the breast.
Image

Congratulations! Your chicken is now spatchcocked.


Grab your rub and thoroughly season the meat side of the chicken
Image

Now flip the chicken so that the skin side is up. Grab your rub/butter mixture and….

Carefully work your fingers between the skin and the meat so that you don’t tear the skin.
Image

Take some of your butter rub mix and spread it around under the skin.
Image

Image

Do the same with the other side of the breast and both thighs. You may have to cut a small slit in the edge of the skin of the thigh to get it started. Again be careful not to tear the skin.
Image

Now sesaon the outside of the skin. You may want to pat the skin dry with a paper towel one more time. The dryer the skin the crispier it will be when cooked.
Image

Don’t forget to lift up the wings and season the “pits”
Image

Put the finished bird on a plate or sheet pan, loosely cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate.
Image

Now get your grill ready!

We are going to do this chicken using indirect heat with a drip pan directly under the chicken. In this example I’m using a standard Webber kettle grill, lump charcoal, and a ½ size aluminum hotel pan as a drip pan. I’m using indirect heat instead of having coals directly under the chicken because I want to add some smoke flavor using some cherry wood. While spatchcock chickens are great over direct heat (but that ‘s another tutorial) I want to give the smoke a little more time to flavor the chicken so I want a slower cook.

Check your pan fit in your grill before you add coals!
Image

Light a full chimney of charcoal.
Image

Before you add you charcoal to your grill, take the chicken and the drip pan and see which way the pan needs to be position to cover as much of the chicken as possible. If any of the chicken is hanging over the edges of the pan it may burn.
Image

Checking the fit
Image

Position the pan in the grill and add the hot coals on both sides. Make sure you leave an area at the back of the pan free of coals if you are going to use a probe thermometer. If you are going to add wood for flavor do it now. You don’t need a lot of wood! Chicken is easy to over smoke, two or three small chunks is plenty.
Image

Now insert you thermometer probe into the deepest part of the breast.
Image

Oil your grill grates to prevent sticking, and place the chicken on the grill centered over the drip pan.
Image

Set your temperature alarm for 162 degrees and the timer (backup!) for 1 hour
Image

Cover and go have a lovely beverage.
Image

Depending on your grill, your charcoal, and how big the chicken is, it should cook to 162 degrees in 50 to 75 minutes.
Image

At this point, if you like really crispy skin you can pull the bird off the grill, lift off the grate, take out the drip pan, rake out coals evenly across the bottom of the grill, place the upper grate back in the grill, then flip the bird over skin side down for 2 –3 minutes

Once you are done, you can plate it
Image

Slice it
Image

and eat!
Image

Hope this helps. Enjoy!
No Clicky Blind Linky's!
There is no problem that can’t be solved with a liberal application of sex, tequila, money, or high explosives, not necessarily in that order
I've been kissed by Pixie!
User avatar
Slamdunkpro
Fleet Admiral Briner
 
Posts: 5155
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2006 6:11 pm
Location: Northern Virginia

Postby Gil » Tue Aug 19, 2008 8:02 pm

Would it work the same way if you split the breast as opposed to removing the backbone or would it affect the cooking time?
User avatar
Gil
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Aug 17, 2008 4:33 pm
Location: Huntington Village

Postby Slamdunkpro » Wed Aug 20, 2008 1:08 pm

Gil wrote:Would it work the same way if you split the breast as opposed to removing the backbone or would it affect the cooking time?


It won't lay flat if you go from the other side. Besides, why would you want to leave the backbone in?
No Clicky Blind Linky's!
There is no problem that can’t be solved with a liberal application of sex, tequila, money, or high explosives, not necessarily in that order
I've been kissed by Pixie!
User avatar
Slamdunkpro
Fleet Admiral Briner
 
Posts: 5155
Joined: Sat Jan 21, 2006 6:11 pm
Location: Northern Virginia

Postby todd » Fri Feb 13, 2009 9:48 am

WOW!
This is gonna be GREAT!
User avatar
todd
Vice Admiral Briner
 
Posts: 2475
Joined: Thu Nov 10, 2005 7:49 pm
Location: ct.

Postby koshersalty » Mon Feb 23, 2009 7:45 pm

Thanks Dr. Slam!

I did a little mid-winter grilling inspired by your post. I started with two on-sale fryers for about 3 bucks a pop. Brined 'em in zen-simple brine, but added a splash of liquid smoke because I knew I would be utilizing the gas grill since there's 6" of snow on the ground.

The spatchcocking went fine. I learned that I need a good quality paring knife that's sharp as hell. My boning knife (dull boner?) was not the proper tool for the job.

The grilling went fine, except that it was definitely a direct-heat affair. flare ups were definitely an issue. I'll await your 'other post' for tips on direct grilling.

The remote thermometer was handy cause it was cooold outside!

Pretty ladies all spread out and greased up.
Image

I forgot to take pics on the grill...too cold out! I was excited to eat so I forgot to take 'after' pics until after dinner.
Image

The flavor was faaaaantastic. Skin was nice and crispy. The liquid smoke made up for the non-charcoal fire. This is the only way to cook chicken on the cheap. Aside from a half a stick of butter and some spices (I used penzey's BBQ of the Americas and some medium chili powder) and a bag of salad, the whole thing cost less than ten bucks.

The kids said that "It tastes like summer!" which I agree with completely. I wish I had some sweet corn! Oh well...soon enough.

Thanks SDP! I have a new tool in the culinary toolbox!
http://www.do1thing.us
---------------
What doesn't kill us only makes us wierder...
User avatar
koshersalty
Vice Admiral Briner
 
Posts: 1280
Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2006 8:39 pm
Location: St. Johns, MI

Postby Jay von » Thu Apr 23, 2009 7:06 pm

I've done this twice this week. Boy Howdy, is it good!

The second run, I used two small fryers, which fit perfectly on my 22.5 Weber kettle. I cooked them for a bunch of foodie friends, one of which is a chef. They were amazed.

I advise everyone to try this!

Thanks Slam!
Image
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Image
User avatar
Jay von
Resident Hippie
 
Posts: 1796
Joined: Wed Jul 23, 2008 7:04 am
Location: Charleston, SC

Re: Grilling 101 – Spatchcocked Chicken

Postby RogerBaldomero » Tue Nov 02, 2010 1:14 pm

Thanks for the great lesson slamdunkpro. That chicken looks so tasty!

A lot of great link building services most notably may very well be unique article wizard. Do you consider salehoo review is a good example or possibly a why don't you consider an truth about six pack abs within the net. Soon after theirs all the satellite direct to enjoy . My personal checked each fat burning furnace as well as the eat stop eat instruction last night.
RogerBaldomero
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Nov 02, 2010 1:11 pm


Return to GEFP College Of Knowledge

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron