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www.goodeatsfanpage.com • View topic - Tutorials you'd like to see

Tutorials you'd like to see

Here you'll find tutorials, how-to's, gear discussions and everything you need to make your kitchen a well-oiled machine.

Moderators: Grovite, Slamdunkpro

Tutorials you'd like to see

Postby Slamdunkpro » Tue Feb 24, 2009 2:45 pm

So far the list includes:
  • Deep Dish Pizza (done)
  • Crab cakes
  • Pressure cooker short ribs
  • Tenderloin the easy way
  • Beef Brisket 3 ways (trimming and cooking)
  • Ribs
  • Molecular Gastronomy 101


What else would you like to see?
Last edited by Slamdunkpro on Sun Mar 08, 2009 2:18 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Jay von » Mon Mar 02, 2009 10:42 pm

I'd like to see a few simple oven or pressure cooker ways to do "Country Style" Ribs. They are so cheap. It would be great to have some go-to methods that don't require all day in a crock pot.
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Postby nolafoodie » Mon Mar 02, 2009 11:57 pm

How about sausage making?
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Postby ABwannabe » Tue Mar 03, 2009 12:29 pm

[Replacing my incorrectly-posted review request]

How about a tutorial on cutting a chicken?
Last edited by ABwannabe on Tue Mar 03, 2009 12:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby nolafoodie » Tue Mar 03, 2009 12:34 pm

I made this suggestion in the "reviews" thread, but in the interest of keeping things where they belong...

How about knife sharpening?
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Postby KittyFixer » Tue Mar 03, 2009 7:52 pm

Jacques St. Coquille.

Delicious, not red meat, and easier than you think. Why go out to schmancy restaurants to eat????

Oh yeah- and I get to eat the props when we're done shooting it!!! :)
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Postby Slamdunkpro » Tue Mar 03, 2009 7:59 pm

Do you mean

Coquille St. Jacques ?

Scallops in champagne sauce
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Postby nolafoodie » Tue Mar 03, 2009 8:18 pm

Perhaps one can make the argument that those scallops should be canonized? ;)
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Postby Pixietoes » Tue Mar 03, 2009 8:56 pm

KittyFixer wrote:Jacques St. Coquille.

Delicious, not red meat, and easier than you think. Why go out to schmancy restaurants to eat????

Oh yeah- and I get to eat the props when we're done shooting it!!! :)


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Postby koshersalty » Sun Apr 05, 2009 7:13 pm

Risotto.

Leg of Lamb.

Indian food.

Chinese food.

Thai food.

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Postby nolafoodie » Sun Apr 05, 2009 7:28 pm

And let's have some molecular gastronomy type tutorials. Leo seems to have a lot of knowledge of sous vide, and MHalbrook seems to have had some fun with chemicals. :D
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Postby stinkypanda » Thu Apr 16, 2009 4:13 am

I'd love to see a basic primer on kitchen essentials, perhaps for those of us who are just starting out?

I'm trying to build up a core set of kitchenware (I'm in my first apartment out of college!), and it's hard to figure out what is more versatile and where I can skimp until a few paychecks down the line.
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Re: Tutorials you'd like to see

Postby FuturePastryChefLou » Sat Sep 12, 2009 11:48 am

Rye bread that tastes just as good as what I can get from my local deli. Gotta have a nice glossy exterior (which more than likely means an egg wash), and a soft, jewish rye interior. I know it's a sourdough, but I want the best rye bread ever. It's a bread I've never tackled, and one that I don't have a good recipe for.
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Re: Tutorials you'd like to see

Postby Jikuu » Thu Dec 03, 2009 12:09 pm

I'd like to see a tutorial on scones. The past few times I made scones, I did it straight from the recipe, but they always came out soft like biscuits. I'm not certain how I'm supposed to get proper scone texture or know what the dough should look like.
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Re: Tutorials you'd like to see

Postby mbuck » Wed Mar 03, 2010 4:35 pm

I am praying that the upcoming grilling pizza episode includes instructions on modifying charcoal grills into wood fired pizza ovens.
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Re: Tutorials you'd like to see

Postby ABwannabe » Mon May 31, 2010 11:10 am

Back before the purge, there was a *great* post on "the care and feeding of Cast Iron", including what to do with rusty CI.

That would be a great tutorial (yes, I've now got a slightly rusted CI loaf pan).
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Re: Tutorials you'd like to see

Postby koshersalty » Mon May 31, 2010 11:01 pm

ABwannabe wrote:Back before the purge, there was a *great* post on "the care and feeding of Cast Iron", including what to do with rusty CI.

That would be a great tutorial (yes, I've now got a slightly rusted CI loaf pan).


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Re: Tutorials you'd like to see

Postby nurho83 » Mon May 31, 2010 11:31 pm

I THINK this is the old post. I saved it to a Word document back when I was working on my CI(available here: http://dl.dropbox.com/u/47294/Cast%20Iron%20Cure.doc). I'd attribute it to whomever did it but I don't know who that was.

Curing Cast Iron

See that label on your Lodge cast iron? It says that you should bake your piece at 350* for one hour. Tear that label off and throw it away! 350* is for wussies!

I called and talked to the fine people at Lodge, and they said that your should really cure cast iron at 450-500*. They said that they list 350* on their packaging because they don't want people to wig out if their piece started to smoke at 500*.

So, with that in mind, here is how you should cure your cast iron.

~~NOTE~~ If you are using Lodge Logic, which is pre-seasoned, you do NOT need to cure your piece before you use it. It's already been done for you.

Wash and rinse thoroughly. Make sure the skillet is bone dry before trying to cure.

Preheat oven to 500 degrees. Place cold skillet in oven while it is preheating. Check on it every couple of minutes. You want to pull it out when it is very warm, but not too hot to handle comfortably.

Remove skillet from oven, put 1 tablespoon of Crisco (solid, not the liquid kind) in the center of the pan. Let it melt most of the way.

Smear the Crisco over every surface and into every nook and cranny. You want an ultra-thin coating. You want to be able to feel it on the iron, but not see it.

~Tip~ If you're curing a skillet lid, don't use a paper towel, because the "basting spikes" on the underside of the lid will destroy it in no time. Use a sacrificial terry towel. I bought a 10-pack of terry "bar towels" at Wal-Mart for $3.

Place into a 500 degree oven and let it bake for 2 hours. Turn on your vent, it may smoke a little bit as the Crisco breaks down.

Leave the skillet in the oven until it is completely cool. For some reason, the iron reacts better to a long, slow cool down time.

If your cure should come out a little spotty or uneven, don't panic. Just store the skillet in the oven and leave it in while you bake other things. After each heating, take it out and wipe it down with pure canola oil and return it to the oven. Eventually the skillet will turn jet black.

Repeat this process at least one more time before using the skillet for the first time.

For the first actual use, brown ground beef, fry bacon, or best of all fry a chicken. After cooking, wipe out the accumulated fat and bits until a paper towel comes out reasonably clean.

~TIP~ If you need to scrub the skillet, don't use water. Pour some kosher salt in the bottom of the pan, pour in enough oil to make a paste, and then scrub with a paper towel. Wipe out all of the oil and the salt and wipe down with fresh oil and you're all set.

Wipe down with pure canola oil while the skillet is still hot. Again, you want the thinnest possible coating of oil.

Don't use Pam or anything other than pure canola oil. I've found that several canola oil sprays leave a nasty residue on the metal if it reaches a certain temperature, but pure canola oil doesn't. Repeat this step after every single use as maintenance.

DO NOT, I repeat, DO NOT cure the cast iron with ordinary canola, peanut, or vegetable oil. Using these will result in a sticky, brown, uneven cure.


409b) How do I re-season my cast iron utensil?

This is also from Brian S at the GEFP Message Board:

Ok, say you've got a really crummy cure on your skillet, or that you've got one with a lot of built-up grease and carbon. If you have a rusty skillet, go to the end of this guide for a guide to removing rust.

You want to strip the piece down to the bare metal and start again. Here's how you do it. There are two ways to strip the cure off of cast iron: burning it off and eating it off.

Burning Off the Cure

There are a number of ways to do this, but they all involve high heat.

Gas Grill

Place your skillet upside down on a cold grill.

Turn the heat to it's highest possible setting, leave the lid down, and let skillet bake for a minimum of one hour.

Check it after one hour. The old cure should either turn into a fine white ash that you can brush off, or it might flake off. It may or may not need more time on the heat.

No Gas Grill

Ok, so you don't have a gas grill, what do you do? Well, I don't know about you, but I have a lot of camp grounds in my area and they all have either a fire pit or free-standing BBQ grills/pits.

Make a day of it, go out in the country, build a bon fire and place your iron in the heart of the fire. Have a picnic, feed the fire, make s'mores, etc. Let the fire die down to embers and CAREFULLY remove the iron. It would be best if you could leave it in the pit until it cooled completely.

If you can't build a bonfire, use one of these free-standing BBQ pits or grills. This may or may not work, depending on how hot of a fire you can get.

Get a load of coals going, lay down a layer, put the cast iron directly on top of that layer, pile coals on top of that iron and let it burn.

Another easy way to burn the cure off is to put your iron in your oven during its self-clean cycle. Since I don't have a self-cleaning oven, I've never tried this method, although others have told me that it works rather well.

After the Heat

After your iron is completely cool, remove it from the grill/oven/pit.

Take a stiff wire-bristled brush and scrub the iron. Most or all of the old cure should come off quite easily.

After you get the old cure off, wash the piece, dry it, and start with step 1 of my guide to curing cast iron.

Now, if for some reason you absolutely just CAN NOT get to one of the sources of high heat listed above, there is another way. However, it is extremely dangerous if done incorrectly and involves tubs full of a caustic chemical that is perfectly happy to dissolve human flesh on contact; lye.
Cast iron is cured with fat, lye will eat fat all day long, so lye is used to "eat" the cure off of the iron.

Flesh Eating Lye Bath Cleaning Instructions

Soak cast iron pieces in lye water.

Mix 1 can of lye (i.e., Red Devil) with 4-5 gallons of water in a plastic container.

Suspend pieces utilizing steel coat hangers. Usually several days to a week for really dirty pieces will be enough. You can leave pieces in the tub for months (yes, months) and they will not rust and are not damaged by this method.

Remove pieces after soaking and rinse with hose and relatively high water pressure. If grease does not wash away, try wiping with stainless steel souring pad or brush.

Repeat the lye bath as required.

After piece(s) are dry, brush with fine steel brush on drill or wire wheel.

Wash the piece in dishwashing soap and warm water and rinse thoroughly. Dry. You can speed the drying by placing in the oven at 200 degrees.

Generously apply oil; completely coating the item. Let stand overnight.
Wipe off excess oil with paper towel and buff with a soft cloth

Rust

Neither lye nor high heat remove rust. To get rid of rust, do the following:

Soak pieces in solution of 50% white vinegar and 50% water for several hours.

Now this will depend on each piece, BUT remember vinegar is an acid and acids EAT metal You will ruin your piece if you let it in the bath too long. This is NOT like the lye bath.

Remove from vinegar solution, rinse and rub/brush to determine if rust has been removed. Repeat vinegar bath if required.

Dry, oil, wipe, buff as above.
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Re: Tutorials you'd like to see

Postby carla » Tue Jun 01, 2010 2:10 am

Yes, nurho. I saved it Nov. 2003, Brian S indeed.
Hope he's doing well.

Might be nice to make a place for it in this forum.
Or is it already? :oops:
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Re: Tutorials you'd like to see

Postby ABwannabe » Tue Jun 01, 2010 9:57 am

B..B..But I wanna see cool pictures! :P

Seriously, thanks for the follow-ups. I knew you guys would have the info!
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Re: Tutorials you'd like to see

Postby tj » Fri Mar 25, 2011 8:13 am

What, pray tell, does one do with a tub full of lye solution?

I don't think pouring into the neighbor's wading pool is a good idea.

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