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www.goodeatsfanpage.com • View topic - Sourdough Bread.

Sourdough Bread.

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Sourdough Bread.

Postby GeofWaller » Mon Aug 31, 2009 11:07 am

Sourdough Bread

Since I’ve been posting my trials and tribulations with my sourdough starter and I’ve finally achieved success, I thought I’d share a tutorial with everyone.

First things first, the Starter.

Peter Reinhart’s starter meathod is what helped me finally get this right. Combine 3oz organic whole wheat or rye flour with 2oz pineapple juice, mix together and cover loosely. Let this sit at room temperature, 72 degrees is ideal, for 24 hours. The organic whole grain flour has enough wild yeasts in it to get you started, and the pineapple juice is just acidic enough to promote the sourdough bacterias you want while discouraging the nasties.

After 24 hours combine the yesterday’s mixture with 3oz AP flour and another 2oz pineapple juice. Cover loosely again and let sit at room temperature for another 24 hours. It should double in size after 24 hours. If it doesn’t double feed it again; discard half and add 3oz AP flour and 2oz water, continue this procedure daily until the starter can double in size in 24 hours. This could take up to four days.

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Once your starter can double itself in 24 hours you should be good to go. You can now procede to making your mother sponge or you can refridgerate your starter until you’re ready. If you choose to refridgerate your starter you should feed it at least 2 hours and no more than 12 hours before you attempt to make a mother sponge.

Mother Sponge.

In a 1 quart bowl stir together 4 ½ oz of your refreshed starter, 3-4 oz bottled or filtered 70-80 degree water (no chlorine here, please) and 5oz unbleached AP flour.

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Cover loosely and let rise at room temperature until doubled in bulk, 2-3 hours. At this point you can go right to the dough or you can refridgerate your mother sponge overnight for better flavor.

The Dough

If you refridgerated your sponge, let it stand at room temperature for an hour before making the dough. Add 12oz of 70 degree bottled or filtered water to the bowl of your stand mixer.

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Add the sponge to the water, fit the dough hook and run the mixer at the lowest speed until the sponge is dissolved in the water. Add 24oz unbleached Bread flour, ½ cup at a time, to the bowl of your mixer.

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Once all the flour has been added continue to mix until the dough forms a ball, about 1 minute longer.

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Cover the dough with plastic wrap and let sit for 20 min. This will allow the flour to hydrate and the gluten strands to align, making a better structure in the finished loaf. After the dough has rested take your fingers and make a small pocket in the center.

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Add 2 teaspoons of kosher salt to the pocket.

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Knead on low speed until the dough is soft, smooth and moist (not sticky) about 5 minutes. Transfer to a clean work surface and knead by hand until the dough forma a firm ball, about 30 seconds.

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Lightly spray container or bowl with at least 4-quart capacity with nonstick cooking spray; place dough in container and lightly spray surface of dough. Take internal temperature of dough; then cover tightly with plastic wrap. If temperature registered below 78 degrees, set container at room temperature (about 70 degrees) in draft-free spot; if warmer than 78 degrees, set container at cool room temperature (about 65 degrees) in draft-free spot. Let stand until dough doubles in bulk, 3 to 5 hours.

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Scrape dough out onto clean work surface. Gently stretch dough (to redistribute and refresh yeast) as far as possible without tearing, then fold it into thirds like a letter.

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Using bench scraper or chef's knife, divide dough in half, each piece weighing about 1 1/2 pounds.

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Form each half into rough ball, cover loosely with plastic wrap or damp kitchen towel, and let rest 15 minutes. To shape dough, use one hand to push dough against unfloured work surface, using other hand as guide. Goal is to make taught ball without ripping surface.

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Spray rounds lightly with nonstick cooking spray and cover loosely but completely with plastic wrap. Refrigerate overnight 8 to 12 hours.

Remove rounds from refrigerator and gently slide onto room-temperature surface where they can rise undisturbed for several hours; space them at least 6 inches apart. Loosen plastic wrap to allow rounds to rise; let rise until at least doubled in bulk and dough barely springs back when poked with your knuckle, 3 to 4 hours.

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Meanwhile, after about 2 hours, adjust one oven rack to middle position and the other to the lowest, place baking stone on middle rack, and a pan on the lowest rack, heat oven to 500 degrees.

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Working one at a time, carefully slide rounds on parchment onto baking peel, rimless cookie sheet, or inverted rimmed baking sheet. I like to use my pizza peel and semolina flour. Using sharp razor blade or knife held at 45-degree angle to work surface, slash surface of rounds 1/2 to 3/4 inch deep.

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Working quickly, spray loaves with water, pour 2 cups boiling water into the pan on the lower rack, slide onto baking stone, and immediately reduce oven temperature to 450 degrees. During first 5 minutes of baking, spray loaves with water 2 additional times; bake until deep golden brown and instant-read thermometer inserted into center of loaves registers about 210 degrees, about 30 minutes total. Transfer loaves to wire rack, discard parchment, and cool loaves to room temperature on wire rack, about 2 hours (I couldn’t wait that long).

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Re: Sourdough Bread.

Postby Kamidanshir » Mon Aug 31, 2009 11:12 am

This recipe looks like it uses up all the starter you spent days making; is there a way to keep it going from batch to batch?
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Re: Sourdough Bread.

Postby GeofWaller » Mon Aug 31, 2009 11:14 am

Actually, it only used half the starter. When I'm getting ready to make the bread, I feed the starter without discarding any so I have plenty left over to keep going.

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Re: Sourdough Bread.

Postby frodo » Mon Aug 31, 2009 9:15 pm

Thanks for the tutorial.

The most important question for me though is: Does it taste anything like pineapple? I despise pineapple. Could I use another acidic juice to discourage the nasties (tomato juice, orange juice, wine, etc. ?)

I'm guessing that the green sheen on the dough was from the camera and it didn't actually look like lime dough.

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Re: Sourdough Bread.

Postby GeofWaller » Mon Aug 31, 2009 9:20 pm

No pineapple flavor at all.

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Re: Sourdough Bread.

Postby GeofWaller » Mon Aug 31, 2009 9:24 pm

frodo wrote:I'm guessing that the green sheen on the dough was from the camera and it didn't actually look like lime dough.

Yeah, I was shooting at different times of day and we have compact fluorescent bulbs in the kitchen fixtures so the white balance was a bit of a challenge.

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Re: Sourdough Bread.

Postby nolafoodie » Tue Sep 01, 2009 6:55 am

Great tutorial -- thanks for sharing! :)
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